Interview with a Jobless People

The Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB), formerly called the National Iranian Radio and Television until the Iranian revolution of 1979, is an Iranian media corporation which hold the monopoly of domestic radio and television services in Iran, is also among the largest media organizations in Asian and Pacific region, and a regular member of Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union. IRIB is independent of the Iranian government and its head is appointed directly by the leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.[3] With 13,000 employees and branches in 20 countries worldwide, including France, Belgium, Malaysia, Lebanon, United Kingdom, the United States, the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting offers both domestic and foreign radio and television services, broadcasting 12 domestic television channels, 4 international news television channels, six satellite television channels for international audiences, and 30 provincial television channel available countrywide and of which make use of local accents or dialects. The IRIB provides twelve radio stations for domestic audiences and through the IRIB World Service thirty radio stations are available for foreign and international audiences.[4] In addition also publishes the Persian-language newspaper Jaam-e Jam

Ahmadinezhad Interview New

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is an Iranian politician who was the sixth President of Iran from 2005 to 2013. He was also the main political leader of the Alliance of Builders of Islamic Iran, a coalition of conservative political groups in the country. An engineer and teacher from a poor background,[12] ideologically shaped by thinkers such as Navvab Safavi, Jalal Al-e Ahmad and Ahmad Fardid,[13] Ahmadinejad joined the Office for Strengthening Unity[14] after the Iranian Revolution. Appointed a provincial governor, he was removed after the election of President Mohammad Khatami and returned to teaching.[15] Tehran’s council elected him mayor in 2003.[16] He took a religious hard line, reversing reforms of previous moderate mayors.[17] His 2005 presidential campaign, supported by the Alliance of Builders of Islamic Iran, garnered 62% of the runoff election votes, and he became President on 3 August 2005.[18][19] During his presidency, Ahmadinejad was viewed as a controversial figure within Iran, as well as internationally. He has been criticized domestically for his economic policies[20] and disregard for human rights.[21] Internationally, he is criticized for his hostility towards some countries, most notably Saudi Arabia, Israel, the United Kingdom, and the United States and other Western and Arab nations. In 2007, Ahmadinejad introduced a gas rationing plan to reduce the country’s fuel consumption, and cut the interest rates that private and public banking facilities could charge. He supports Iran’s nuclear program. His election to a second term in 2009 was widely disputed[25][26] and caused widespread protests domestically and drew significant international criticism.[27] During his second term, Ahmadinejad came under fire not only from reformers but also traditionalists[28] in parliament and the Revolutionary Guard, and even from Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei,[29] over accusations of corruption, Ahmadinejad’s dismissal of Intelligence minister Gholam-Hossein Mohseni-Eje’i, and his support for his controversial close adviser Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei.[30] On 14 March 2012, Ahmadinejad became the first president of the Islamic Republic of Iran to be summoned by the Islamic Consultative Assembly (parliament) to answer questions regarding his presidency.[31][32] Limited to two terms under the current Iranian constitution, Ahmadinejad supported Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei’s campaign for president.[28] On 15 June 2013, Hassan Rouhani was elected as Ahmadinejad’s successor and assumed office on 3 August 2013. On 12 April 2017, Ahmadinejad announced that he intended to run for a third term in the 2017 Iranian presidential election, against the objections of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei.[33] His nomination was rejected by the Guardian Council.[34][35]